Irish Hotel Prices Hit €94 Per Night… Or Do They?

5th March 2014
Pól Ó Conghaile

€94 is the average price of a hotel room in Ireland, according to Hotels.com.

Except it isn’t, counters the Irish Hotels Federation (IHF).

The Hotel Price Index, which is based on Hotels.com bookings made by customers (rather than advertised rates), found Irish hotel prices rose 4% to a year-on-year average of €94 per night.

In “a positive year for Irish tourism”, other findings include:

  • Dublin prices rose 7%  in 2013 to an average of €96 per night
  • Killarney is Ireland’s most expensive destination at €106 per night
  • Hotel prices in Galway dipped 4% to an average of €96 per night
  • Limerick is Ireland’s best value destination at an average of €68 per night

Hotels.com cites “the continued recovery of Irish hotel prices in 2013”, attributing the 4% rise to a successful year for tourism with The Gathering, festivals, sporting events and concerts around the country boosting visitor numbers. Overall visitors to Ireland were up 7% in 2013, according to CSO figures.

The IHF, however, sternly rejects its figures.

Conclusions drawn from the Hotel Price Index “do not stand up to scrutiny”, it says.

“The hotels.com survey is based solely on the prices for rooms purchased from hotels.com and does not reflect the broad range of rates actually available in the market – the vast majority of which are booked through other sources,” it told me last night.

The IHF won’t suggest an average hotel rate itself, but charges that the Hotels.com sample size is “far too small to be representative of the 60,000 hotel rooms available for sale every day in Ireland, let alone to draw conclusion about individual towns and counties across the country.”

It also points out that annual inflation for accommodation services was less than 1% in 2013, according to CSO figures, and recommends that customers shop around.

The IHF/Hotels.com face-off is a regular result of the Hotels Price Index.

Last September, the IHF decried a “cheap publicity shot” that was “misleading” and “in no way reflective of the excellent value that is available in the market.”